DENVER – In the past six months, more than $284 million in federal funds has been provided to Coloradans as they recover from last September’s devastating floods.

More than $222 million has come in the form of disaster grants to individuals and families, flood insurance payments and low-interest loans to renters, homeowners and businesses. More than $62 million has been obligated to state and local governments’ response and recovery work.

At the same time, long-term recovery efforts are underway, staffed and funded by federal, state and local governments, and by volunteer agencies dedicated to helping those most in need.

The $284.9 million breaks down this way: (All figures are as of COB March 3, 2014.)

  • $60,418,419 in FEMA grants to more than 16,000 individuals and families for emergency home repairs, repair or replacement of essential personal property, rental assistance, and help with medical, dental, legal and other disaster-related expenses;
  • $98,750,000 in U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans to more than 2,440 homeowners, renters and businesses;
  • $63,641,332 in National Flood Insurance Program payments on 2,071 claims, and
  • $62,055,973 in FEMA Public Assistance reimbursements to state and local governments for emergency response efforts, debris cleanup, repairs or rebuilding of roads, bridges and other infrastructure, and restoration of critical services.

“The flooding disrupted the lives of thousands, changed the course of streams, isolated mountain communities, and left major roadways impassable in many places,” said Tom McCool, federal coordinating officer for the disaster. “More than 1,200 men and women from FEMA were mobilized from all over the country to this disaster. We’re proud to be part of the team as Coloradans recover, rebuild and renew their lives.”

Over a five-day period last September, historic rainfall swept through the Front Range, with some areas receiving more than 17 inches of rain. The flooding killed 10 people, forced more than 18,000 from their homes and destroyed 1,882 structures, damaging at least 16,000 others. Some of the hardest hit communities included Jamestown, Lyons, Longmont, Glen Haven, Estes Park and Evans.

At the request of Gov. John Hickenlooper, President Obama signed a major disaster declaration for Colorado on Sept. 14, 2013.

The 11 counties designated for Individual Assistance under the major disaster declaration are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan and Weld.

The 18 counties designated for Public Assistance are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, Crowley, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Gilpin, Jefferson, Lake, Larimer, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Sedgwick, Washington and Weld.                 

Other federal recovery activities and programs include:

Hazard Mitigation

  • Approximately 50 percent of Public Assistance permanent repair work and nearly 65 percent of large (more than $67,500) Public Assistance projects contain mitigation measures to lessen the impact of similar disasters on publicly owned infrastructure. These mitigation measures have been approved for 123 projects with a cost of $3,439,200.
  • FEMA hazard mitigation specialists have provided county and local officials with technical assistance and reviews of existing flood control measures and challenges, helping revise hazard mitigation plans, and providing advice and counsel on numerous mitigation and flood insurance issues.
  • FEMA flood insurance inspectors assisted county officials to assess substantial damage at identified sites.
  • National Flood Insurance Program specialists as well as the state NFIP coordinator and state mapping coordinator met with the City of Evans to discuss floodplain management and the city’s recent adoption of the Weld County preliminary maps. The State and FEMA will continue to work with city officials by providing additional training and technical assistance to support their floodplain management program.

Disaster Case Management Program

  • FEMA has awarded a Disaster Case Management Grant of $2,667,963 to the State of Colorado. Under this state-administered program, case managers will meet one-on-one with survivors to assess unmet disaster-related needs that have not been covered by other resources.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance

  • $302,795 has been dispersed to 151 applicants in this federally funded, state-administered program.

Crisis Counseling Grant Program

  • Colorado Spirit crisis counselors have talked directly with 18,178 people and provided referrals and other helpful information to more than 88,000. Counselors met with nearly 1,200 individuals or families in their homes. The counselors are continuing door-to-door services and community outreach counseling programs. In mid-March, the longer-term Crisis Counseling Regular Services Program grant will be awarded to the State to continue the program.
  • The grant will provide an additional nine months of crisis counseling outreach services to survivors.

Voluntary Agencies

  • At the height of the disaster there were 53 agencies that ultimately provided a total of 275,784 volunteer hours. Survivors received shelter, food, water, snacks, muck-out, and debris removal.
  • Long Term Recovery Groups have been established in Larimer, Weld and Boulder counties, and Longmont and Lyons.
  • El Paso and Fremont counties are offering case management through El Paso County Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters.

Disaster Legal Services Program

  • Through the Colorado Bar Association/American Bar Association  program, 284 State Bar-Licensed volunteer attorneys assisted 619 survivors with disaster-related legal issues. The program completed operations at the end of February.

Federal Disaster Recovery Coordination

  • The Federal Disaster Recovery Coordination group has brought together federal and state subject-matter experts to advise local and state decision-makers on the best methods to achieve an effective recovery. The FDRC focuses on how best to restore, redevelop and revitalize the health, social, economic, natural and environmental fabric of the community.
  • The group’s recently released Mission Scoping Assessment lists recovery-related impacts and the breadth of support needed, as well as evaluates gaps between recovery needs and capabilities. Its soon-to-be-released Recovery Support Strategies document outlines state recovery priorities and discusses how federal agencies can support those efforts.
  • The State of Colorado, FDRC and other federal agencies are:
  • assisting Lyons and Jamestown with long-term community planning and recovery organization;
  • facilitating a survey to gauge impacts of flooding on business communities;
  • helping identify housing options for disaster survivors, and
  • helping local governments identify stream channel choke points so local communities can prioritize limited hazard reduction in streams.

Social Media

  • By clicking the “like” button on the COEmergency Facebook page, Coloradans can get detailed posts with useful information and photos. The Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management’s (DHSEM) Twitter account COEmergency has more than 23,000 followers and offers disaster recovery information, links to news products and other information that disaster survivors may still find useful.
  • More than 1,000 tweets have provided response and recovery information. Since the September floods began, more than 1,200 new participants have started following FEMA Region 8.

Originally posted here - 

Colorado Flooding – Six Months Later

DENVER – Three Disaster Recovery Centers in Boulder, Larimer and Weld counties will close permanently at 3 p.m., MST, Saturday, Dec.14.

BOULDER COUNTY

Twin Peaks Mall

1250 S. Hover Rd.

Longmont, CO 80501

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., MST

 

LARIMER COUNTY

Rocky Mountain Park Inn

Conference Center

101 S. St. Vrain Ave.

Estes Park, CO 80517

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., MST

 

WELD COUNTY

Village Centre at the Landings

3613 23rd Ave.

Evans, CO 80620

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., MST

 

Those whose homes or businesses were affected by the September flooding can continue to get in-person help for U.S. Small Business Administration or FEMA questions at the Boulder Disaster Recovery Center (Boulder County).

BOULDER COUNTY

Premier Credit Union Building

5495 Arapahoe Ave.

Boulder, CO 80303

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., MST; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., MST

 

DRCs are operated by the Colorado Office of Emergency Management and FEMA in partnership with the SBA, county and local governments.

After the centers close, disaster survivors can call FEMA at 800-621-3362 to have questions answered about their disaster assistance registration, check their application status, or update their insurance claim or contact information. A FEMA representative is available at the toll-free number from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., MST, seven days a week.

Small businesses and most private nonprofits without physical losses have until June 16, 2014 to apply for Economic Injury Loans only.

Anyone with questions concerning a loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) or for information about SBA programs, go to sba.gov/disaster or call (800) 659-2955   (TTY 1-800-977-8339).

Small businesses and most private nonprofits without physical losses have until June 16, 2014 to apply for Economic Injury Loans only.

Multilingual phone operators are available on the FEMA Helpline. Choose Option 2 for Spanish and Option 3 for other languages. People who have a speech disability or are deaf or hard of hearing may call (TTY) 800-462-7585.

Register online:  DisasterAssistance.gov or by Web-enabled device, tablet or smartphone: type

m.fema.gov in the browser.

View original:

Three Disaster Recovery Centers to Close

DENVER – The Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) in Lyons, Boulder County, will close at  6 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 18.

BOULDER COUNTY 

Lyons Elementary School Gym

338 High St.

Lyons, CO 80540

Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., MST, Friday, Nov. 15.

9 a.m. to 3 p.m., MST, Saturday, Nov. 16.

Closed on Sunday, Nov. 17.

9 a.m. to 6 p.m., MST, Monday, Nov. 18.

DRCs are operated by the Colorado Office of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in partnership with the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), county and local governments.

To find the DRC closest to you, go to fema.gov/disaster-recovery-centers.

Survivors with losses from the storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides will save time by registering for help from FEMA before going to the DRCs.

Register with FEMA by phone, 800-621-3362, from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., MST, seven days a week.  Multilingual phone operators are available on the FEMA Helpline. Choose Option 2 for Spanish and Option 3 for other languages. People who have a speech disability or are deaf or hard of hearing may call (TTY) 800-462-7585; users of 711 or Video Relay Service can call 800-621-3362.

Register online:  DisasterAssistance.gov or by Web-enabled device, tablet or smartphone: type m.fema.gov in the browser.

See the article here:

Disaster Recovery Center in Boulder County Will Close

DENVER – In the two months since heavy rains brought flooding, Colorado survivors have received more than $117.4 million in state and federal assistance and low-interest loans and an additional $35.1 million in FEMA’s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) payouts.

To date, more than $52.7 million in Individual Assistance (IA) grants has helped more than 15,000 Colorado households find safe, functional and sanitary rental units or make repairs to primary homes and cover other disaster-related expenses, such as medical needs or personal property loss. Nearly $48.7 million of IA grants have been issued in housing assistance and $4 million in other needs assistance, such as medical or personal property loss. Flood survivors have also received disaster unemployment assistance and disaster legal services.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) has approved $64.7 million in disaster loans to Colorado homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and private nonprofit organizations. Of that amount, $54.3 million was in loans to repair and rebuild homes and $10.4 million in business and economic injury loans. Approved loan totals in some of the impacted areas are currently $40 million in Boulder County, $8.9 million in Larimer County and $7.7 million in Weld County.

In addition:

  • FEMA housing inspectors in the field have looked at more than 24,000 properties in the 11 designated counties for Individual Assistance.
  • In coordination with the State and local officials, FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance specialists have canvassed Colorado neighborhoods, helping 37,180 survivors connect with recovery services. Survivors have talked to local, state, nonprofit, nongovernmental and FEMA specialists at the Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs). At the DRCs, in the field and on the phone, FEMA provides information in Spanish and many other languages.
  • More than 50 national, state and local voluntary and faith-based organizations have spent 269,330 hours helping people as they recover from the flooding. The 27,655 volunteers are providing donations, volunteer management, home repair, child care, pet care, counseling services and removal of muck and mold from homes.
  • In the 18 counties designated for Public Assistance, 190 Applicant Kickoff Meetings have been conducted and so far FEMA has obligated $9,451,743 for eligible projects for debris removal, emergency protective measures and the repair of critical public-owned infrastructure.
  • FEMA and the State’s Private Sector team has contacted organization leaders from 33 Chambers of Commerce, six Economic Development Centers and 38 colleges and universities to share disaster assistance information.
  • The Federal Disaster Recovery Coordination group is coordinating disaster recovery across the entire federal family of agencies, facilitating long-term relationships among agencies, identifying technical expertise and funding opportunities; suggesting strategies for addressing specific needs, and generally encouraging a whole community approach to disaster recovery.

    • Coordinating agencies represented in FDRC include U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and U.S. Department of Commerce.
  • Speakers Bureau has received 71 requests from local officials throughout the affected area and 363 State/FEMA specialists and SBA representatives have spoken at town hall meetings and other venues. More than 7,600 attendees received information about FEMA’s IA program, Hazard Mitigation, flood insurance and SBA.
  • Mitigation specialists have counseled 15,250 survivors during outreach efforts at area hardware stores and more than 4,300 survivors at Disaster Recovery Centers in Colorado.
  • In the first 60 days of the Colorado flooding disaster, there have been 96,375 total page views on the disaster web page, fema.gov/disaster/4145, or an average of 1,606 daily. More than 500 tweets in the last 60 days were posted on the FEMA Region 8 Twitter feed, an average of eight daily tweets. The R8 Twitter feed has increased its followers to 9,000, an increase of nearly 600 new followers in the past 60 days.
  • At the request of the State, the 11 counties with FEMA IA designations are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan and Weld.
  • At the request of the State, the 18 counties with FEMA Public Assistance (PA) designations are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Clear Creek, Crowley, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Gilpin, Jefferson, Lake, Larimer, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Sedgwick, Washington and Weld.

County-By-County Breakdown of State and Federal Grants

Adams County

Housing Assistance:

$1,017,068

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$118,156

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$1,135,224

 

 

 

Arapahoe County

Housing Assistance:

$2,928,379

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$255,331

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$3,183,710

 

 

 

Boulder County

Housing Assistance:

$28,419,729

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$1,820,947

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$30,240,676

 

 

 

Clear Creek County

Housing Assistance:

$190,128

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$2,426

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$192,554

 

 

 

El Paso County

Housing Assistance:

$1,338,680

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$142,673

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$1,481,353

 

 

 

Fremont County

Housing Assistance:

$43,859

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$1,950

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$45,809

 

 

 

Jefferson County

Housing Assistance:

$1,378,621

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$26,793

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$1,405,414

 

 

 

Larimer County

Housing Assistance:

$4,816,065

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$267,884

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$5,083,949

 

 

 

Logan County

Housing Assistance:

$474,194

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$42,515

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$516,709

 

 

 

Morgan County

Housing Assistance:

$69,450

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$5,037

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$74,487

 

 

 

Weld County

Housing Assistance:

$8,027,426

 

Other Needs Assistance:

$1,338,890

 

Total State/FEMA Assistance:

$9,366,315

Register with FEMA by phone, 800-621-3362, from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m., MST, seven days a week.  Multilingual phone operators are available on the FEMA helpline. Choose Option 2 for Spanish and Option 3 for other languages. People who have a speech disability or are deaf or hard of hearing may call (TTY) 800-462-7585; users of 711 or Video Relay Service can call 800-621-3362.

Register online: DisasterAssistance.gov. Register by Web-enabled device, tablet or smartphone: type m.fema.gov in the browser.

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Colorado Flooding: Two Months Later

President Obama Makes Federal Assistance Available to Individuals

Residents Urged to Follow Instructions from Local Officials

WASHINGTON – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continues to support state and local response efforts to the flooding in Colorado through its National Response Coordination Center in Washington and its Regional Response Coordination Response Center in Denver, Colo.

On Saturday, President Barack Obama declared a major disaster declaration for Boulder County, Colorado.  The President’s declaration makes federal assistance available to individuals for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners in their recovery.

“As response efforts continue, FEMA encourages residents in affected areas to stay informed about changing flood conditions and follow the direction of local officials,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. “Let your friends and family know that you’re safe. Impacted residents in Boulder County can start registering for federal assistance today.”

Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in Boulder County, Colo. can apply for assistance by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362).  Disaster survivors who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362.  Those in the affected area with access to the internet may register by Web-enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov, or online at www.disasterassistance.gov.

The President’s major disaster declaration also makes federal funding available to state and eligible local governments and certain non-profit organizations to support emergency work in Boulder County to save lives, protect property and remove debris.

When natural disasters such as flooding occurs, the first responders are state and local emergency and public works personnel, volunteers, humanitarian organizations, and numerous private interest groups who provide emergency assistance required to protect the public’s health and safety and to meet immediate human needs.

FEMA’s priority is to support local efforts to keep residents and communities safe. FEMA has two Incident Management Assistance Teams (IMATs) and a liaison officer on site at the Colorado emergency operations center to coordinate with state and local officials to identify needs and shortfalls impacting disaster response.  Three federal urban search and rescue teams, Colorado Task Force 1, activated by the state, Utah Task Force 1 and Nebraska Task Force 1, are on the ground to support search and rescue operations in hard hit areas.  Two additional federal urban search and rescue teams, Nevada Task Force 1 and Missouri Task Force 1, are en route to Colorado.

FEMA proactively staged commodities closer to the hardest hit areas and areas potentially affected by the severe weather and flooding.  More than 65,000 liters of water, 50,000 meals and other supplies have been delivered to Incident Support Bases established by FEMA. These resources are being provided to the state as needed and requested. A FEMA Incident Response Vehicle is in Colorado providing communications support to the emergency operations center for the town of Lyons.  FEMA has identified additional teams and personnel to support the state should they be needed and requested.

On Thursday, September 12, President Barack Obama declared an emergency for three counties in Colorado, and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local response efforts.  The declaration made direct federal assistance support immediately available to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety in areas of Colorado, including Boulder, El Paso and Larimer counties, affected by the severe storms, flooding, landslides and mudslides.

We urge residents to continue to monitor weather conditions, and those in impacted areas to listen carefully to instructions from their local officials and take recommended protective measures to safeguard life and property while response efforts continue.  According to the National Weather Service, the official source for severe weather watches and warnings, flooding advisories remain in effect for several areas in Colorado, and severe weather remains in the forecast through the weekend in some areas. 

Here are a few safety tips to help keep you safe during flooding:

  • Turn Around, Don’t Drown. Avoid flooded areas.
  • Give first responders space to do their work by following local public safety instructions.
  • Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.
  • Roads may still be closed because they have been damaged or covered by water. Barricades have been placed for your protection. If you come upon a barricade or flooded road, turn around, don’t drown. Go another way.

Those in areas with the potential to be affected by flooding should familiarize themselves with the terms that are used to identify a flood hazard and discuss what to do if a flood watch or warning is issued:         

  • Flood Watch: Flooding is possible. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.
  • Flood Warning: Flooding is occurring or will occur soon; if local officials give notice to evacuate, do so immediately.
  • Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible. Be prepared to move to higher ground; monitor NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.
  • Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately.

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) are now being sent directly to many cell phones on participating wireless carriers’ networks. WEAs sent by public safety officials such as the National Weather Service are designed to get your attention and to provide brief, critical instructions to warn about imminent threats like severe weather.  Take the alert seriously and follow instructions. More information is available on WEA at www.ready.gov/alerts.

For more information and flood preparedness tips, please visit: www.ready.gov or www.listo.gov to find out how you can prepare your family for flooding and other disasters.

Link:

FEMA Continues to Support Response to Colorado Flooding

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal emergency aid has been made available to the State of Colorado to supplement state and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from severe storms, flooding, landslides, and mudslides beginning on September 11, 2013, and continuing.

The President’s action authorizes FEMA to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the counties of Boulder, El Paso, and Larimer.

Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, limited to direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

William J. Doran III has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal response operations in the affected area. 

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at www.fema.gov/blog, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

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Original link:  

President Obama Signs Colorado Emergency Declaration